Beware The Food Police!

We have long argued that food is the new frontier for the fun police, and the nanny statists have certainly been busy these last few days seeking to impose their radical conformist ideological agenda onto the rest of us.

Today’s News.com.au reports that nanny statists are calling for a ban on fastfood smartphone apps, claiming that teens become… wait for it… addicted to it! That’s right, that universal catch-all cry of the nanny statists “addiction”, is now being applied not just to food, but to phone apps! There is not even a pretence any more that this concept of addiction has any evidence or science behind is, or is  anything more than a smokescreen to attack personal responsibility and individual choice. After all, if they say you are “addicted” then they can take action!

Here’s the prime example used by the nanny statists:

However Sydney dietitian Caroline Trickey said a morbidly obese 15-year-old patient, who used the app every day, had been using vouchers repeatedly in a single visit, sharing them with friends because busy staff members often forget to reset them when they are redeemed.

“He had been seeing me for his obesity but not losing weight, and it wasn’t until the last consultation when I discovered that he has this app on his phone,” she said.

“He was using it every single day with friends – they’d all walk home together and unfortunately they’d go near a Hungry Jack’s store and all five of them would get their phones out and shake them and invariably one of them wins something.

That’s right. It’s not the fault of the individual for, you know, going to Hungry Jacks every day, oh no. Rather, it was the fact that he had a phone app he could use while he was there. And if we only just could ban the phone app, then everything would be fine!

This is just utter madness.

And of course, insanity is not only to be found at home.

In a fad sweeping London and sure to catch on here in the next year or so, government inspectors are banning restaurants from serving food rare or even medium rare. Australia’s most renown food blogger, Prick with a Fork, says it best:

Who the hell is Westminster Council – or any other agency – to stand in the way of a contract between diner and chef? I mean, this is England we’re talking about. Birthplace of the Magna Carta. Font of liberty. Home of parliamentary democracy. And the government there now thinks how rational adults order their meat is any of their business? Were Churchill alive today he’d surely be saying, We defeated the Nazis for

Do we need to rehearse the various assaults on freedom, personal liberty and good taste in cities like New York or Sydney? Or mention the pincer assault by Barack and Michelle Obama on the restaurant industry in the US where between health care regulations, demonization campaigns, and fretting about obesity, simply trying to fill peoples’ bellies and make a buck at the same time has become a very fraught business indeed? Not even lemonade stands are safe.

No, this sort of thing is not – and never really is – about health and safety. It is about control, which is what for-your-own-good fascism is at its heart all about.

For-your-own-good fascists have much in common with other sorts of totalitarians and statists who have always had it in for restaurants because they represent enterprise and innovation and allow people to enjoy the fruits of their labour by decadently letting someone else do the cooking. Restaurants, cafés, and pubs have traditionally been pillars of civil society and hotbeds for people to come together without the endorsement or supervision of the state, something that makes certain types very nervous indeed.

(Read the rest of his post here)

So. There you have it.

One thought on “Beware The Food Police!

  1. Pingback: Nanny Statists Advocate Food Rationing: Not A Joke | MyChoice Australia

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